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Schnader Celebrates 70th Anniversary by Establishing Public Interest Law Fellowships

On May 10, 2005 by Schnader in News

CONTACT:
Tricia M. McCoy
Public Relations Manager
215-751-2061

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Philadelphia, PA (May 10, 2005) – To commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Firm, Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP has announced the establishment of five fellowships at public interest law centers in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh and New York.

“Celebrating our anniversary in this way allows us to mark a milestone in the Firm’s history while making a meaningful contribution to our communities in a way that honors our heritage of pro bono and public service work,” said Schnader Chairman Ralph G. Wellington.

The Schnader 70th Anniversary Public Interest Law Fellowships have been awarded to the Urban Justice Center in New York City; Neighborhood Legal Services in Pittsburgh; and the Homeless Advocacy Project, Philadelphia Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts and the SeniorLAW Center in Philadelphia.

The Firm will furnish each organization with a $4,000 grant to fund a summer clerkship for a law student working at that organization for the summer of 2005 or the summer of 2006, according to 70th Anniversary Committee Chair Mark Momjian.

Since 1935, Schnader has valued service to its community and, over the past 70 years, has developed a national reputation for meaningful and varied pro bono work. The Firm’s founders laid the groundwork for that commitment – from Earl G. Harrison’s inspection tour of former Nazi concentration camps at the end of World War II and his work as director of the American Civil Liberties Union and NAACP to Bernard Segal’s formation of the Lawyers Committee on Civil Rights at the urging of then-Attorney General Robert Kennedy.

Today, Schnader lawyers participate in a range of pro bono and community activities from successfully litigating death-penalty appeals to providing legal advice and representation as part of their commitment to public service.

News of the fellowships was repoted in the July 8 issue of The New York Law Journal.